On November 13th, 2020, the Friday workshop for the tutoring staff had two parts.  The first part was facilitated by one of our own tutors, Madam Oliva Temba, from Magereza Primary School and it concerned Carpet-Making.  The second part was led by members of Femme International who came to talk to us about Feminine Health Empowerment.  Please enjoy the report below!

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The facilitator of the session was our tutor from Magereza Primary School, Madam Oliva Temba, who began the session at 1pm by welcoming all the attendees and introducing the topic called Carpet-Making (the craft of mat-making).

Oliva asked questions to the tutors concerning the topic and the tutors had to share their ideas such as “What is a carpet?” and “How are the carpets being used in the room?” and “What is the importance of making carpets at home?”

The facilitator, Oliva, talked about the meaning and importance of carpets and then explained that the craft of carpet-making is divided into two parts which include entrepreneurship and arts.  She explained in deep about the two groups and then she mentioned the materials needed in making carpets which include needles, thread, plastic bags, and marker pens.  Oliva showed practically how to make a carpet, and winded up the session by displaying different carpets she had made at home.  She advised tutors to start making carpets themselves.

Next, there were guests from Femme International, Miss Violet and Mr. Elijah.  Femme International is an organization which aims to empower girls to feel strong and confident in their bodies during menstruation.  They have a Feminine Health Empowerment program which is designed to use education and conversation to break the menstrual taboo and help girls manage their cycles in a safe and effective way.  Violet and Elijah gave a presentation on how to use pads and they showed different tools which are also good to use during menstruation.

Lastly, Violet and Elijah winded up the session by talking about various programs provided by Femme International such as the Twende program which trains local women to be sales agents of menstrual products in their own communities.

Recommendations that came out of these workshops were that involvement in handicraft-making is good so tutors should put in practice what they have been taught and make different items for use at home but also they can do it for small business.  Also, that it is important to empower women and girls during their time of menstruation so they do not feel badly about themselves, but understand that their cycles are normal and natural and they can manage them with pride.